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Mike Lehmann

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Click here for FREE software from Oracle http://www.oracle.com/go/?&Src=1170761&Act=6 Introduction Web services are the "new kids on the block" and as with all adolescent technologies they are can be a little troublesome, take time to understand and always testing you with something new. Given this, how does a developer get started with Web services? And for those more experienced, how does the developer speed up the developing, debugging, and deployment cycle? In this paper we will hope to provide a jump-start to both these questions. We will run through the basics of building Web services using the following steps: Modeling Web services Building a Web service based on a EJB Publishing an EJB Web service Deploying a Web service to an Oracle9i Application Server and Apache SOAP server Working with WSDL Building a Web service Client Incorporating 3rd Party Web servic... (more)

Deploying Large-Scale Interoperable Web Services Infrastructures

Web services have moved beyond the experimental stage in many organizations and are now becoming the foundation of numerous service-oriented architectures. Thus, architects are concerned about best practices for building, deploying, and maintaining a large-scale interoperable Web services infrastructure. In one sense, Web services applications are like other applications. They represent a code base developed by a team of engineers. This code base needs to go through a methodological development life cycle, followed by testing and quality assurance, before it is finally released.... (more)

Opening the Black Box of Integration

If you've been working with integration technologies for any length of time, you're well aware of the freight train of standards that has been careening through the industry during the last five years. These standards, particularly in the Web services space, are on the verge of doing to proprietary integration servers what SQL and J2EE standards did to database and middle-tier servers of days gone by. Database veterans remember when Cullinet ruled the roost; many felt it had no technical equal. SQL was an interesting idea, but not for real projects. Likewise, long-time middlewar... (more)